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Dog Training for Dummies by Jack and Wendy Volhard

Today is the perfect day to finish up our dog days series here at Of Print and Prose.  Today, Reeses and I drove to Richmond to officially complete her adoption!  We got to see some friends from Houlagan’s Rest and hear that all of Reeses’s siblings have also found good homes!

Wallace is a well-trained dog!

Wallace is a well-trained dog!

I feel a little bad reviewing two “for Dummies” books at once, but it’s what I’ve been reading.  This one was recommended by our dad, who has already used it to train his dog Wallace.  I ordered a copy, and we’ve already started using it in training sessions with Reeses.

I really like the way the authors laid out the section on basic training.  They give multiple steps to teach each command, which I find very helpful.  Everything is very specific, with details such as how often to give rewards, how many times per training session to practice a certain command, and so on.  Then, they offer steps to help your dog learn the command with distractions.  After that, they sometimes suggest common sense ways to test your dog’s ability to perform the command, and suggest which step to return to for extra practice.

I was also intrigued by the chapters on nationwide dog training programs.  These were created by the American Kennel Club to promote responsible dog ownership, and unlike many of their competitions, any dog can participate.  The main one is the Canine Good Citizen certificate.  After training, the dog and owner participate in a test.  What I like is that the test is for very sensible skills that help a dog be a good neighbor, such as greeting a friendly stranger.

I have mixed feelings about the range of topics in the book, which didn’t always relate directly to training.  On the one hand, I appreciate the information on grooming.  I can see why this was included, since it is possible to train dogs to get used to having their ears and paws handled, so that they will behave better when they are being groomed.  On the other hand, there was tons of information about nutrition, which seemed a little excessive.  I’m not questioning the importance of good nutrition, but that’s something I would prefer to ask my vet about, as opposed to consulting a reference book.  Plus, it seems only marginally related to training.  That said, the layout of these books makes it very easy to skip past the portions you don’t find helpful and focus on the ones you do.

Some helpful tips I learned from this book are:

1. Use basic commands like “sit” and “stay” to help your dog behave politely in a wide variety of situations.  Reeses is learning to “stay” after she comes in from a walk (instead of climbing under furniture to take a nap.)  It’s a lot easier to take her leash off that way!

2. You can clean your dogs ears with a cotton ball and a mixture of apple cider vinegar and water.

3. The Volhards give specific recommendations for how to help shy dogs get used to meeting new people.  Basically, you have the new person walk by a few times, pausing to toss the dog a treat.  This way, they can gradually get closer without approaching the dog directly or bending over her, which can intimidate a shy dog.

4. Clean your shoes and your dog’s feet when you get home from the dog park.  This helps prevent your dog from catching infections, and they can still make friends.

I’d recommend this book to anyone with a dog.  It is a well-organized reference that would be helpful no matter how old your dog is.  It also has information about advanced training and competitions for those who are interested.  I give this book three and a half stars.  I will be referring to certain chapters regularly, and I definitely think it is worth buying.  ★★★1/2

Elizabeth and Reeses reading together

Elizabeth and Reeses reading together

I hope you enjoyed the Dog Days series!  Please stay tuned for a return to our regular posts!

-Elizabeth

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